GMO Bodies– Music Video “Look what theyve done to my body MOM” – YouTube

THE Unintended ways GMO’s are affecting the American Population- Video brings it home and shows what you and your family may already be experiencing. TIred, Moody, Depressed– GMO’s are creating GMO BODIES. VOTE YES Prop 37 in California

Local Harvest

The best organic food is what’s grown closest to you. Use our website to find farmers’ markets, family farms, and other sources of sustainably grown food in your area, where you can buy produce, grass-fed meats, and many other goodies.

National Pineapple Upside Down Cake Day

Cook time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

Topping:*

  • 1 cup of firmly packed dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 1 can (20 oz) of pineapple slices

Cake:

  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 6 Tbsp cake flour
  • 6 Tbsp of ground almonds (from about 2 oz of whole almonds)
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 3/4 cups of sugar
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 4 large eggs
  • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup sour cream

METHOD

1 Start by making the caramel topping. Take brown sugar and butter and combine and melt in a saucepan on medium heat until sugar dissolves and the mixture is bubbly, this should take several minutes. (After sugar melts, don’t stir.) Pour mixture into a 10 inch diameter stick-free cake pan with 2 inch high sides. Arrange pineapple slices in a single layer ontop of the caramel mixture.

2 Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Whisk the flours, almonds, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, use an electric mixer to beat the sugar and butter together until light. Add eggs one at a time, beating after each addition. Beat in the vanilla. Add dry ingredients alternately with sour cream in 2 additions each, beating well after each addition. Pour cake batter over caramel and pineapple in pan.

3 Bake cake until tester inserted into the center comes out clean, about 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes. Cool cake in pan on a rack for 10 minutes. Turn cake out onto a platter. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 12 to 14 servings.

Simply Recipes

PINEAPPLE UPSIDE DOWN CAKE

The term ‘upside down cake’ wasn’t used very much before the middle of the 19th century, but the style of baking probably dates back much further, probably to the Middle Ages.

The early recipes for fruit upside down cakes were made in cast iron skillets on top of the stove.

The classic American ‘Pineapple Upside Down Cake’ dates to sometime after 1903, when Jim Dole invented canned pineapple.

The Hawaiian Pineapple Co. (now Dole Pineapple) held a pineapple recipe contest in 1925, with judges from Fannie Farmer’s School, Good Housekeeping and McCall’s magazine on the judging panel. The 100 winning recipes would be published in a cookbook the following year.

Over 60,000 recipes were sent in, and 2,500 of them were for Pineapple Upside Down Cake. So it is obvious that between 1903 when canned pineapple was first available, and 1925 when the contest was held, Pineapple Upside Down Cake had become a very popular item.

The Hawaiin Pineapple Company ran an ad campaign in 1926 based on the fact that so many recipes for the cake had been submitted, naturally making the Pineapple Upside Down Cake even more popular.

Related:

Garlic day

“Stop and smell the garlic! That’s all you have to do.”  William Shatner

Garlic History

American foodies snubbed garlic until the 1940’s

The word garlic comes from Old English garleac, meaning “spear leek.”Dating back over 6,000 years, it is native to Central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

Egyptians worshiped garlic and placed clay models of garlic bulbs in the tomb of Tutankhamen. Garlic was so highly-prized, it was even used as currency. Folklore holds that garlic repelled vampires, protected against the Evil Eye, and warded off jealous nymphs said to terrorize pregnant women and engaged maidens. And let us not forget to mention the alleged aphrodisiacal powers of garlic which have been extolled through the ages.

Surprisingly, garlic was frowned upon by foodie snobs in the United States until the first quarter of the twentieth century, being found almost exclusively in ethnic dishes in working-class neighborhoods. But, by 1940, America had embraced garlic, finally recognizing its value as not only a minor seasoning, but as a major ingredient in recipes.

Quaint diner slang of the 1920’s referred to garlic asBronx vanilla, halitosis, and Italian perfume. Today, Americans alone consume more than 250 million pounds of garlic annually. Read more…

Garlic Health Benefits

Garlic has been used as both food and medicine in many cultures for thousands of years, dating back to when the Egyptian pyramids were built. In early 18th-century France, gravediggers drank crushed garlic in wine believing it would protect them from the plague that killed many people in Europe. During both World Wars I and II, soldiers were given garlic to prevent gangrene. Today garlic is used to help prevent heart disease, including atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries (plaque buildup in the arteries that can block the flow of blood and may lead to heart attack or stroke), high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and to boost the immune system. Garlic may also help protect against cancer.

Garlic is rich in antioxidants, which help destroy free radicals — particles that can damage cell membranes and DNA, and may contribute to the aging process as well as the development of a number of conditions, including heart disease and cancer. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause over time.

The conditions for which garlic is showing the most promise include: Read more…

Happy National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day

“Man cannot live by bread alone; he must have peanut butter.” ~ James A. Garfield

Legend has it that American soldiers in World War II mixed their ratios of peanut butter and jelly to make a new treat. When they returned home sales of peanut butter and jelly soared. Everyone was soon making PBJ sandwiches. This fun day is a great time to sit down to the table and play with your sandwich.

Related:

I Found Your Dog Today…

I found your dog today. No, he hasn’t been adopted by anyone. Most of us who live out here have all the dogs we want and those who do not have dogs do so because they choose not to. I know you were hoping he would find a good home when you left him out here, but he did not. When I first saw him he was miles from the nearest house and he was alone, thirsty, thin and limping from a burr in his paw.

How I wish I could have been you as I stood before him. To see his tail wag and his eyes brighten as he bounded into your arms, knowing you would find him, knowing you had not forgotten him. To see the forgiveness in his eyes for the suffering and pain he had known in his never-ending quest to find you, but I was not you. And despite all my persuasion, his eyes saw only a stranger. He did not trust. He would not come.

He turned and continued his journey; one he was sure would bring him to you. He does not understand you are not looking for him. He only knows you are not there, he only knows he must find you. This is more important than food or water or the stranger who can give him these things.

Persuasion and pursuit seemed futile; I did not even know his name. I drove home, filled a bucket with water and a bowl with food and returned to where we had met. I could see no sign of him, but I left my offering under the tree where he had sought shelter from the sun and a chance to rest. You see, he is not of the desert. When you domesticated him, you took away any instinct of survival out here. His purpose demands that he travel during the day. He doesn’t know that the sun and heat will claim his life. He only knows that he has to find you.

I waited hoping he would return to the tree; hoping my gift would build an element of trust so I might bring him home, remove the burr from his paw, give him a cool place to lie and help him understand that the part of his life with you is now over. He did not return that morning and at dusk the water and food were still there untouched. And I worried. You must understand that many people would not attempt to help your dog. Some would run him off, others would call the county and the fate you thought you saved him from would be preempted by his suffering for days without food or water.

I returned again before dark. I did not see him. I went again early the next morning only to find the food and water still untouched. If only you were here to call his name. Your voice is so familiar to him. I began pursuit in the direction he had taken yesterday, doubt overshadowing my hope of finding him. His search for you was desperate, it could take him many miles in 24 hours.

It is hours later and a good distance from where we first met, but I have found your dog. His thirst has stopped, it is no longer a torment to him. His hunger has disappeared, he no longer aches. The burrs in his paws bother him no more. Your dog’s been set free from his burdens, for you see, your dog has died.

I kneel next to him and curse you for not being here yesterday so I could see the glow, if just for a moment in those now vacant eyes. I pray that his journey has taken him to that place I think you hoped he would find. If only you knew what he went through to reach it, and I agonize, for I know that were he to awaken at this moment, and if I were to be you, his eyes would sparkle with recognition and his tail would wag with love and forgiveness.

Our companion animals are living feeling beings who depend on us for care. They are not garbage to be thrown out with the trash or abandon along roadsides. Please think before you go dumping an animal off thinking it can fend for its self or that someone else is going to find and give it a home. The fact is, most will die, lonely, hungry, and terrified. So please be responsible by trying to find your companion animal a new home or by taking it to your local animal shelter.

Below is a video of one little dog named Rosie who was lucky enough to have been rescued by a very lucky earth angel.

http://www.hopeforpaws.org – Rosie was dumped in the desert with no food and no water. Temperatures were over 100 degrees, and she was terrified and wouldn’t let anyone get near her. I drove 3 hours north to give it a try. This video will tell the full story.

Life With Dogs. A place where you can meet many animal loving friends: http://www.facebook.com/eldad75?ref=ts#!/lifewithdogs?ref=ts

Creamy Rice Pudding

Prep Time: 25 Min                 Cook Time: 20 Min                 Ready In: 45 Min

I wanted a snack the other day and thought I would try this recipe. It turned out really nice. Thick and creamy yet not to sweet, perfect!

Ingredients

3/4 cup uncooked white rice

2 cups milk, divided

1/3 cup white sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 egg, beaten

2/3 cup golden raisins (Optional)

1 tablespoon butter

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

In a medium saucepan, bring 1 1/2 cups water to a boil. Add rice and stir. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. In the same saucepan combine cooked rice, 1 1/2 cups milk, sugar and salt. Cook over medium heat until thick and creamy, 15 to 20 minutes. Stir in remaining 1/2 cup milk, beaten egg and raisins. Cook 2 minutes more, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, and stir in butter and vanilla. Sprinkle with nutmeg or cinnamon, if desired. For creamier pudding, use short or medium grain rice.”Serve warm.

Creamy Rice Pudding